Sunday, March 30, 2014

Unchurchy

Recently the aging rock star Bono was interviewed about his belief in God. When it was broadcast about 340,000 people watched, which is not a bad congregation. He willingly moves to his Christian faith, which is unapologetically Trinitarian. I have to say that I was pleasantly surprised. Obviously Bono is not your typical orthodox Christian. He doesn't look "churchy" and his vocabulary can be decidedly "unchurchy." It's obvious though that Christ is central in his faith, that he sees Jesus as God, and that prayer is important in his life. I would address some of the questions he is asked differently, but I connect with him on those three tenets.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIm7JRSo6w4

I find it interesting that our culture is becoming less concerned about the conventions of religious life which tend to be remnants of a particular post-war approach to Christian expression. But there is an openness to those who may be unconventional but "generously orthodox." Nadia Bolz Weber the author of Pastrix is another example. You may recall me musing about this tattoo-covered Lutheran pastor in the States who is getting lots of attention these days.

Any thoughts about this edgier yet orthodox expression of Christian faith? Is it disturbing or encouraging to you that they're out there? Is it okay to "colour outside the lines" of the conventions, or are they part of the package of faith?

3 comments:

Judy Mcknight said...

Jesus coloured outside of the lines, didn't He?
He was definitely unorthodox... why should today's followers have to fit with a prescribed image?
If their lives show the presence of Christ, that is what matters.

Laura said...

I have been thinking about this interview the last few days because it really struck me. I guess I found comfort in Bono's ability to offer his deep faith without big theological words or historical arguments but rather defend/proclaim his faith just in the confidence of his own experience of having Jesus in his life. I admire that....

David Mundy said...

Yes, it is so unapologetic and unvarnished and authentic.